THE ROLE OF BACTERIAL MULTIGENE FAMILIES IN INFECTION: IDENTIFICATION OF HOST TARGET NETWORKS BY HIGH-THROUGHPUT PROTEIN INTERACTOMICS

Description

The genomes of pathogenic bacteria often contain multiple copies of genes with similar sequence. The encoded proteins are generally secreted or associated with the bacterial surface and are thus likely to be involved in the host-pathogen interaction. However, the functions of these multi-gene families in pathogenesis remain largely unknown. We will investigate the role of bacterial multi-gene family proteins in the host-pathogen interaction taking a Systems Biology-based approach. We will focus on two model pathogen-specific virulence-related proteins families: the Inl (internalin) proteins from the gram-positive genus Listeria, and the Vap (virulence-associated) proteins from Rhodococcus equi, a pathogenic actinomycete related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We will also investigate the Mce and PE/PPE proteins, which are distributed among several pathogenic actinobacteria including R. equi and MTB. Different members of these multi-gene families are found in genotypes or species differing in virulence and pathogenic tropism. Our hypothesis is that the specific multi-gene complements carried by the different

KEY DATES
  • Status
  • Completed
  • Project Launch
  • 01 July 2010
  • Project completed
  • 30 June 2012
genomes Infection systems biology
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